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The leak that wasn’t a bug (i.e. one reason programming is hard)

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > Bugs are a pain, they eat time, destroy quality, and seem to almost always happen at inopportune times. What’s even worse is when the bug is in a 3rd party library or somebody else’s code. My application needed to […]

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The faller’s wedge & ubiquitous language

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > I’ve recently been reading Domain-Driven Design, by Eric Evans. One of the foremost things Evans discusses is ubiquitous language, which he defines as: A language structured around the domain model and used by all team members to connect all […]

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Customer Support is about LOVE

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > Yes, customer support is about love! It’s about caring and doing something because you care. Here are some relevant definitions from Dictionary.com: Love –1. a profoundly tender, passionate affection for another person9. affectionate concern for the well-being of others: […]

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Scripting Refactoring — Overthrowing the GUI (part 4)

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > Over the last few blog posts I’ve mentioned a number of different reasons why it would be nice to be able to script the application of refactorings. This post talks more about one possible scripting language that could be […]

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Scripting Refactoring — Overthrowing the GUI (part 3)

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > I’ve already mentioned why it might be useful to perform refactorings in bulk. Perhaps we’ve decided we followed a poor naming convention, or perhaps we’ve moved some classes into their own namespace, so part of the class name is […]

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Scripting Refactoring — Overthrowing the GUI (part 2)

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > Last week I introduced a hokey syntax that could be used to identify various elements that were going to be refactored in bulk. The syntax was ambiguous and incapable of expressing anything of even mild complexity. Now for something […]

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Scripting Refactoring — Overthrowing the GUI

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > The most basic and common refactoring in any language is Rename. Whether it’s Rename Variable, Rename Method, Rename Class, or Rename Namespace/Package, this simple refactoring helps improve code clarity and, when applied correctly, makes code easier to understand. As […]

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Enabling Bulk Refactorings

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > In my last post, I talked about some of the limitations of refactoring IDEs and enumerated three different cases that could better be handled by refactoring IDEs: Vendor Branches – can we make refactorings apply like patches? Universal Language […]

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Limitations of Refactoring IDEs

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > Coupled with every strength is a weakness. Within an IDE, the ability to leverage the utility of a mouse is a strength. When trying to automate the selection of the next four characters, no matter where you may be […]

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Things I Wish I Knew…

This post was imported from blogger, to see the original, likely better-formatted post see kalebpederson.blogspot.com. > When I was a young child an adult friend of mine took me over to his house and showed me his Commodore 64 computer. From the moment I saw the music software and the other things that he could […]

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